Nokia 8.1 promo video leaks ahead of the official unveiling

HMD Global’s event in Dubai on December 5 is expected to be the launchpad for up to three smartphones, including the Nokia 8.1 – for a while this has been rumored to be nothing but a rebranded international version of the Nokia X7 that has been available in China since October.

And now, mere hours before said event, a promo video for the Nokia 8.1 has been outed, which intriguingly shows us a much larger notch than the Nokia X7’s. The phones could still be identical on the inside, though, with only that visible differentiating feature.

As you can see, the video emphasizes the camera’s Zeiss optics with OIS, its prowess in shooting superior low-light images, its ability to make “AI” portraits, and beautiful bokeh. The screen supports HDR10, and that’s all we get from this presentation. It looks like the Nokia 8.1’s marketing will be very focused on the camera (excuse the pun), if this is anything to go by.

Anyway, stay tuned for all of the official details coming straight from the Dubai event in a few hours.

[“source=vogue”]

Technology augments our experience of the world, allows us to work more efficiently: Isobar report

The ‘Augmented Humanity: Isobar Trends Report 2019’ explores the changing nature of the human relationship with technology: from how we work and play, to how we travel, shop, spend our leisure time and engage with brands. Also find five key trends that businesses and brands need to know

Isobar, the global digital agency from Dentsu Aegis Network, has released the ‘Augmented Humanity: Isobar Trends Report 2019’, an exploration of five digital trends for 2019. The report explores the extent to which humanity will work in harmony with technology to expand and enrich life in 2019.

Written by the innovation and strategy experts across Isobar’s 85 offices in 45 markets, the report, which is available for download at isobar.com, is built on the concept of Augmented Humanity, developed by Isobar, in 2018. The 2019 trends report explores the changing nature of human relationship with technology: from how we work and play, to how we travel, shop, spend our leisure time and engage with brands.

The report is centred round a belief that technology augments our experience of the world, allowing us to work more efficiently, to live healthier lifestyles, to make better human decisions and to expand our creativity. It explains why Isobar believes that this is an important moment in human history, outlines some of the myriad opportunities that these technological developments open up and shines a light on some of the challenges posed by digital disruption.

Jean Lin

Jean Lin, Isobar’s Global CEO, said, “Technology today plays a key role in driving relevance, scale, and elevating human experiences. It is our job to harness its wonderful power and the potential for businesses and brands, in serving people better in the age of Augmented Humanity.”

Shamsuddin Jasani

Commenting on the launch, Shamsuddin Jasani, Group Managing Director, Isobar South Asia, said, “We need to embrace the power of technology. Today, we are on the edge of an augmented age where technology is redefining the possibilities of what a human can truly be capable of. This next phase of transformational technological advances, wearable and embedded devices will unlock human potential by tapping into almost all our day to day activities. In 2019, we shall see how digital is going to be omnipresent and VOICE will be the biggest game changer in the field of marketing.”

Isobar’s five key trends for 2019 are:

  1. The evolving interface: How the intersection between humans and technology is changing
  2. The human algorithm: How data can help us to better understand ourselves and enable better decisions
  3. The fluid vs the collective self: How the digital world enhances personal and collective experiences
  4. The trust paradox: How technology can help or hinder our understanding of the increasingly complex world around us
  5. The transformed experience: How Augmented Humanity enables us to feel and experience the world differently and in deeper ways

The annual report provides guidance on navigating this new landscape to keep businesses and brands ahead of the curve for 2019 and beyond. Each chapter outlines why these developments are important, key examples of the trends in action, why businesses need to be aware of them and how they can take advantage of their positive potential.

[“source=cnbc”]

Focus shifts to Sheryl Sandberg as Facebook battles critics over practices, lack of oversight

For the past decade, Sheryl Sandberg has been the poised, reliable second-in-command to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, helping steer Facebook’s rapid growth around the world, while also cultivating her brand in ways that hint at aspirations well beyond the social network. But with growing criticism over the company’s practices or lack of oversight, her carefully cultivated brand as an eloquent feminist leader is showing cracks.

Questions these days aren’t so much about whether she’ll run for the Senate or even president, but whether she ought to keep her job at Facebook.

Though the chances of an ouster are slim, the fact that it has even come up shows the extent of Facebook’s — and Sandberg’s — troubles.

“Her brand was being manicured with the same resources and care as the gardens of Tokyo,” said Scott Galloway, a New York University marketing professor.

“And unfortunately a hurricane has come through the garden.”

Facebook has been dealing with hurricanes for the past two years : fake news, elections interference, hate speech, a privacy scandal, the list goes on.

The company’s response — namely, Zuckerberg’s and Sandberg’s — has been slow at best, misleading and obfuscating at worst, as The New York Times reported last week.

That report, and one from The Wall Street Journal , underscored Sandberg’s influence at the company, even as Zuckerberg has borne much of the criticism and anger.

As chief operating officer, Sandberg is in charge of Facebook’s business dealings, including the ads that make up the bulk of the company’s revenue. She steered Facebook from a rising tech startup into a viable global business expected to reap $55 billion in revenue this year. The company is second only to Google in digital advertising.

But she’s also gotten the blame when things go wrong, including Facebook’s failure to spot Russian attempts to influence US elections by buying US political ads — in rubles.

Though Sandberg has denied knowing that Facebook hired an opposition research firm to discredit activists, she created a permissive environment through what the Times called an “aggressive lobbying campaign” against critics. Facebook fired the firm, Definers, after the Times report came out.

Facebook declined to comment on Sandberg or make her available for an interview.

A representative instead pointed to Zuckerberg’s remarks that overall, “Sheryl is doing great work for the company. She’s been a very important partner to me and continues to be, and will continue to be. She’s leading a lot of the efforts to improve our systems in these areas.”

Sandberg, 49, who was hired away from Google in 2008, has been a crucial “heat shield” for Zuckerberg, as Galloway put it, as lawmakers and the public crank up criticism of the 34-year-old founder.

In September, Facebook sent Sandberg to testify before the Senate intelligence committee, eliciting a warmer response than her boss did three months before.

Sandberg, former chief of staff for treasury secretary Larry Summers, appears more comfortable in Washington meeting rooms than Zuckerberg, who can seem robotic.

Her profile is high enough that lawmakers don’t feel stilted when she shows up. She’s written (with help) two books, including 2013’s “Lean In” about women and leadership.

Her second book, “Plan B,” is about dealing with loss and grief after her husband died unexpectedly. She was the lone chief operating officer among a who’s who of tech CEOs — including Apple’s Tim Cook and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos — to meet with Donald Trump a month after his election.

“It’s both who she is and how bereft Silicon Valley is of strong, powerful female voices,” crisis management expert Richard Levick said.

“She has positioned herself as one of those strong voices with ‘Lean In.'” But her high profile also makes her more susceptible to criticism.

The chorus for Sandberg to leave is getting louder. CNBC commentator Jim Cramer predicted Monday that Facebook’s stock would rise if Sandberg leaves or gets fired. NYU’s Galloway believes both Sandberg and Zuckerberg should be fired for allowing Facebook to turn into an entity that harms democracy around the world.

“Every day executives are fired for a fraction of infractions these two have committed,” he said.

Besides elections interference, Zuckerberg and Sandberg have been criticized for their slow response to the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which the data-mining firm accessed millions of users’ private information without their permission.

The pair were silent for days after the news came out. According to the Journal, Zuckerberg told Sandberg this spring that he blamed her and her teams for the “public fallout” over Cambridge Analytica.

Citing unnamed sources, the newspaper said Sandberg at one point wondered if she should be worried about her job (though that appears to no longer be the case, based on Zuckerberg’s public support).

Because of the way Facebook is set up, firing Zuckerberg would be all but impossible. He controls the majority of the company’s voting stock, serves as its chairman and has — at least publicly — the support of its board of directors. Essentially, he’d have to fire himself.

Firing Sandberg would be the next logical option to hold a high-level executive accountable, but Galloway also doesn’t see this happening.

For one thing, he said, it would look bad to fire one of the only top female executives in an industry where women “face inordinately high obstacles to get to leadership positions.” Beyond that, Sandberg has also been a positive force on Facebook.

[“source=cnbc”]

Ghosn scandal could trigger a series of crises for Nissan, Renault, Mitsubishi

Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. 

Marlene Awaad | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018.

There aren’t many automotive executives who can claim to have saved a company, let alone three. But now, Carlos Ghosn might also prove to be the man responsible for shattering the global alliance that transformed Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi into an industry powerhouse.

A day after prosecutors arrested Ghosn and another senior Nissan executive, accusing them of serious financial irregularities, the fallout was escalating. Some auto analysts questioned whether the alliance between the three carmakers could survive the affair, leading nervous investors to pare back their holdings. U.S. traded shares of Renault have slid by about 11 percent since news of Ghosn’s arrest in Tokyo broke Monday while Nissan’s shares in the U.S. fell by about 6 percent.

Self-destruction

“You’re witnessing the single greatest act of self-destruction in modern automotive history,” said Eric Schiffer, chairman of Los Angeles-based Reputation Management Consultants. “Not only has [Ghosn] destroyed his life, but he puts those companies in uncharted and dangerous waters.”

His swift fall from grace places the carefully constructed alliance he built between the three automakers at risk and will have far-reaching repercussions across the industry, auto executives and analysts say.

Perhaps only Tesla CEO Elon Musk and former Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, who died last July, came close to matching the high-profile persona of the 64-year-old Ghosn. Born in Brazil of Lebanese parents, he began his career in France with the tire-making giant Michelin.

In 1996, Ghosn was recruited by Paris-based Renault and tasked with pulling together a turnaround plan for the struggling automaker. His strategy worked so well that Renault was back in the black in barely a year.

Ghosn got the chance to prove he wasn’t a one-shot wonder when Renault assigned him to lead its efforts to revive debt-laden Japanese automaker Nissan in 1996. With only three of its product lines making money, many observers expected that country’s second-largest manufacturer to go broke. There was widespread skepticism when Renault announced plans to purchase a 38.6 percent stake – which has since grown to 43.4 percent.

Skeptics

At the time, former General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz said Renault would be better off “taking $5 billion, putting it on a barge and sinking it in the middle of the ocean.” But within three years, Ghosn’s Nissan Revival Plan had taken hold. The automaker halved its debt and was delivering profit margins of around 4.5 percent.

“I said it would never work” Lutz said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Monday “and to my amazement it has worked fabulously well for both companies.”

Originally working as Nissan’s chief operating officer, Ghosn was soon its CEO and, a few years later, added the title of chief executive of Renault, as well as head of their Renault-Nissan Alliance.

Ghosn had long left open the possibility of adding a third leg to the stool and, in 2016, he made his move, directing Nissan to purchase a controlling stake in Mitsubishi, the small Japanese automaker teetering on the brink of bankruptcy after a series of financial and regulatory scandals.

While still too soon to tell whether Mitsubishi is completely out of the woods, it added enough volume to the alliance total that, in 2017, it nudged past both Volkswagen and Toyota to claim the crown as largest automotive group in the world by unit sales.

Forcibly removed

But that celebration could be short-lived. Ghosn, who has repeatedly sidestepped questions about his potential retirement, is now being forcibly removed from all his posts in the wake of this week’s breaking scandal.

On Monday, Yokohama-based Nissan issued an initially terse release stating that, “Based on a whistleblower report, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. (Nissan) has been conducting an internal investigation over the past several months regarding misconduct involving the company’s Representative Director and Chairman Carlos Ghosn and Representative Director Greg Kelly.”

[“source=cnbc”]

Ghosn scandal could trigger a series of crises for Nissan, Renault, Mitsubishi

Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. 

Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018.

There aren’t many automotive executives who can claim to have saved a company, let alone three. But now, Carlos Ghosn might also prove to be the man responsible for shattering the global alliance that transformed Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi into an industry powerhouse.

A day after prosecutors arrested Ghosn and another senior Nissan executive, accusing them of serious financial irregularities, the fallout was escalating. Some auto analysts questioned whether the alliance between the three carmakers could survive the affair, leading nervous investors to pare back their holdings. U.S. traded shares of Renault have slid by about 11 percent since news of Ghosn’s arrest in Tokyo broke Monday while Nissan’s shares in the U.S. fell by about 6 percent.

Self-destruction

“You’re witnessing the single greatest act of self-destruction in modern automotive history,” said Eric Schiffer, chairman of Los Angeles-based Reputation Management Consultants. “Not only has [Ghosn] destroyed his life, but he puts those companies in uncharted and dangerous waters.”

His swift fall from grace places the carefully constructed alliance he built between the three automakers at risk and will have far-reaching repercussions across the industry, auto executives and analysts say.

Perhaps only Tesla CEO Elon Musk and former Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, who died last July, came close to matching the high-profile persona of the 64-year-old Ghosn. Born in Brazil of Lebanese parents, he began his career in France with the tire-making giant Michelin.

In 1996, Ghosn was recruited by Paris-based Renault and tasked with pulling together a turnaround plan for the struggling automaker. His strategy worked so well that Renault was back in the black in barely a year.

Ghosn got the chance to prove he wasn’t a one-shot wonder when Renault assigned him to lead its efforts to revive debt-laden Japanese automaker Nissan in 1996. With only three of its product lines making money, many observers expected that country’s second-largest manufacturer to go broke. There was widespread skepticism when Renault announced plans to purchase a 38.6 percent stake – which has since grown to 43.4 percent.

Skeptics

At the time, former General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz said Renault would be better off “taking $5 billion, putting it on a barge and sinking it in the middle of the ocean.” But within three years, Ghosn’s Nissan Revival Plan had taken hold. The automaker halved its debt and was delivering profit margins of around 4.5 percent.

“I said it would never work” Lutz said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” on Monday “and to my amazement it has worked fabulously well for both companies.”

Originally working as Nissan’s chief operating officer, Ghosn was soon its CEO and, a few years later, added the title of chief executive of Renault, as well as head of their Renault-Nissan Alliance.

Ghosn had long left open the possibility of adding a third leg to the stool and, in 2016, he made his move, directing Nissan to purchase a controlling stake in Mitsubishi, the small Japanese automaker teetering on the brink of bankruptcy after a series of financial and regulatory scandals.

While still too soon to tell whether Mitsubishi is completely out of the woods, it added enough volume to the alliance total that, in 2017, it nudged past both Volkswagen and Toyota to claim the crown as largest automotive group in the world by unit sales.

Forcibly removed

But that celebration could be short-lived. Ghosn, who has repeatedly sidestepped questions about his potential retirement, is now being forcibly removed from all his posts in the wake of this week’s breaking scandal.

On Monday, Yokohama-based Nissan issued an initially terse release stating that, “Based on a whistleblower report, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. (Nissan) has been conducting an internal investigation over the past several months regarding misconduct involving the company’s Representative Director and Chairman Carlos Ghosn and Representative Director Greg Kelly.”

Within hours, reports began circulating that Ghosn and his hand-picked lieutenant had been arrested by authorities in Tokyo where they faced a number of potentially serious allegations. Ghosn — who was now serving as Nissan chairman — was accused of concealing as much as 5 billion yen, or about $45 million, in income, as well as misusing corporate funds. Precise details have yet to be released, however.

For the past two decades, Carlos Ghosn was seen as one of the biggest rock stars in a Japanese business world normally skeptical of “gaijin,” or foreigners. He even became a star of his own comic book series. Since the accusations were made public, however, his image has been washed away by a tsunami of bad news. Reputation expert Schiffer told CNBC, “There will be blood because it is about preserving honor and trust with the public.”

Anger and disappointment

That became apparent within hours. “I feel strong anger and disappointment,” Ghosn’s handpicked successor as Nissan CEO, Hiroto Saikawa told reporters at Nissan headquarters in Yokohama. “I am very sorry.”

The Japanese automaker quickly moved to fire Ghosn, even as pressure mounted on Renault to do the same thing a half a planet away. The French government, the automaker’s biggest shareholder, called for a shake-up in management. Renault plans to name its chief operating officer Thierry Bollore as an interim replacement for Ghosn, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday, citing unnamed sources.

“Carlos Ghosn is no longer in a position where he is capable of leading Renault,” Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told France Info radio. But he added that the government “(has) not demanded the formal departure of Ghosn from the management board for a simple reason, which is that we do not have any proof and we follow due legal procedure.”

The fallout could, and likely will, continue according to several observers. During a meeting with reporters in Tokyo on Tuesday, Mitsubishi CEO Osamu Masuko said the very alliance that Ghosn strung together is in jeopardy. “I don’t think there is anyone else on Earth like Ghosn who could run Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi,” he said.

[“source=cnbc”]

NASA orders review of SpaceX, Boeing after Elon Musk’s pot-smoking upsets officials: Report

Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Nick Hague of NASA walks with NASA Associate Administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate William Gerstenmaier (C) and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (R) prior to boarding the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft for launch on October 11, 2018.

Bill Ingalls/NASA | Getty Images News | Getty Images
Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Nick Hague of NASA walks with NASA Associate Administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate William Gerstenmaier (C) and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (R) prior to boarding the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft for launch on October 11, 2018.

NASA will conduct a safety review of Boeing and SpaceX, months after the latter company’s founder and CEO Elon Musk smoked marijuana during a videotaped podcast, according to the Washington Post on Tuesday.

The agency’s review of the companies will begin next year, the report says. Musk’s pot-smoking upset high level NASA officials, the Post reported, causing the agency to take a look at SpaceX. The U.S. Air Force also began looking into Musk’s marijuana smoking shortly after the incident.

While NASA officials reportedly focused on Musk’s behavior, Boeing – SpaceX’s competitor under NASA’s Commercial Crew program – is also under review.

“We are focused on safe and successful commercial crew missions to the International Space Station. In the coming months, prior to the crew test flights of Crew Dragon and Starliner, NASA will be conducting a cultural assessment study in coordination with our commercial partners to ensure the companies are meeting NASA’s requirements for workplace safety, including the adherence to a drug-free environment,” NASA said in a statement to CNBC.

NASA’s Commercial Crew program is part of the agency’s plan to once again launch U.S. astronauts from U.S. soil. Since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011, astronauts have flown aboard Russian Soyuz — at a cost to NASA of more than $70 million per seat. The Commercial Crew program is competitive, with contracts up for grabs for SpaceX to win with its Dragon capsules and Boeing with its Starliner capsules.

NASA associate administrator William Gerstenmaier told the Post that the review process will be “pretty invasive.” The agency will take a look at “everything and anything that could impact safety,” Gerstenmaier said. NASA plans to interview hundreds of Boeing and SpaceX employees, according to Gerstenmaier, at all levels of authority.

Top NASA official Jim Bridenstine said in the report that he has “a lot of confidence in the SpaceX team.”

“Culture and leadership start at the top,” Bridenstine told the Post. “Anything that would result in some questioning the culture of safety, we need to fix immediately.”

SpaceX said in a statement to CNBC that flying humans in space “is the core mission” of Musk’s company.

“There is nothing more important to SpaceX than this endeavor, and we take seriously the responsibility that NASA has entrusted in us to safely and reliably carry American astronauts,” SpaceX said. “In addition, SpaceX actively promotes workplace safety and we are confident that our comprehensive drug-free workforce and workplace programs exceed all applicable contractual requirements.”

Boeing similarly emphasized its workplace culture, telling CNBC in a statement that the company ensures “the integrity, safety, and quality” of its workplace and production.

“As NASA’s trusted partner since the beginning of human spaceflight, we share the same values and are committed to continuing our legacy of trust, openness and mission success,” Boeing said.

SpaceX is set to launch its first Crew Dragon demonstration flight without astronauts in January, months ahead of Boeing, which suffered a testing setback to its capsule in June. The earliest Boeing’s Starliner capsule will fly is March, although a government watchdog report earlier this year cast doubt over the aerospace giant’s schedule.

Overall, delays have plagued the Commercial Crew program since 2014, when NASA first handed out multi-billion dollar contracts to SpaceX and Boeing.

Musk’s company is nearing the end of a milestone year. SpaceX had its record-tying 18th launch of the year on Thursday. The company also launched Falcon Heavy for the first time, the most powerful rocket since the Atlas V, as well as the final version of its Falcon 9 rocket called Block 5.

SpaceX also put two test satellites for its “Starlink” network into orbit, with the FCC approving SpaceX to launch thousands more of the satellites to create a broadband communications network comparable to fiber optic networks. Additionally, NASA recently gave SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket a vote of confidence, certifying the rocket on Nov. 8 as a “Category 3 launch vehicle.”

“LSP Category 3 certification is a major achievement for the Falcon 9 team and represents another key milestone in our close partnership with NASA,” SpaceX President and COO Gwynne Shotwell said in a statement.

[“source=cnbc”]

This Samsung exec wants gadgets to start talking to us like friends right out of the box

Gadgets of the future

It sounds incredibly dystopian, and like a nod to Spike Jonze’s 2013 movie Her, but Viv Labs CEO Dag Kittlaus shared his quirky-sounding vision for the future of gadgets and machines during a discussion this week as part of the Samsung Developer Conference. One day, he imagines, you’re going to make a tech purchase of some kind, take it home, pull it out of the box, plug it in — and it’s just going to start talking to you. Politely, like a friend, in a kind of high-tech superseding of the days when you had to navigate start menus and read instructions. It will just know who you are, what you like (thanks to pre-loaded data), and will ask you what you want to do next.

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“I have a vision — and I think a lot of us here at Samsung share this vision — where it’s not just about buying a cool, shiny object anymore,” said Kittlaus, who’s also a co-creator of Apple’s Siri. “I can imagine a day where every time you buy a Samsung product, you literally take it out of the box, plug it in, authenticate yourself somehow and it says, ‘Hi Spike, how’s it going today? I just downloaded your favorite preferences. Do you have any questions on how to use me?”

The reference to Spike was because Jonze himself, along with Samsung CMO Marc Mathieu, were onstage with Kittlaus, who painted an ambitious future for a company that makes and ships 500 million TVs, dishwashers, appliances and other gadgets each year.

“It knows you,” Kittlaus continued, as reported by VentureBeat, “and that is sort of the first step toward moving from, ‘Wow, this is a really cool, shiny new device’ to creating an emotional relationship with a brand or a company that has gone so far as to take these ideas and really turn them into products, where it just makes you feel good when you pull it out of the box. And it knows you, and it knows your past and it can help you.”

It’s yet another radical vision of the future to come out of Samsung’s conference this week, the highlight of which has arguably been its long-awaited reveal of a foldable smartphone display. Samsung, however, also showed off a new version of its Bixby virtual assistant that’s based on technology developed by Kittlaus’ Viv Labs. Samsung’s mobile chief DJ Koh reiterated the 500 million shipments figure during the conference, and when you couple that with the company committing to put AI into all of its devices over the next two years, you quickly see how comments and ideas like Kittlaus’ this week shouldn’t be ignored. As he sees it, it’s a matter of when, not if, we’ll find it utter commonplace to talk to most, if not all, of our tech gadgets.

[“source=forbes]

Fuselage of crashed Lion Air plane believed to have been found: Indonesian official

Indonesia's President Joko Widodo holds a personal item from Lion Air flight JT 610 at the Tanjung Priok port on October 30, 2018 in Jakarta, Indonesia. 

Indonesia’s military chief believes that the fuselage of the crashed Lion Air plane has been found, Reuters reported Wednesday.

Hadi Tjahjanto told a local television channel that a search and rescue team had found what appeared to be “a part of the fuselage of JT610,” referring to the flight operated by Indonesian budget carrier Lion Air, according to the news agency.

He added that the search team had the location coordinates of the wreckage but was trying to confirm that it was indeed the fuselage.

The aircraft carrying 189 people, including crew, from Jakarta crashed into the sea off the island of Java on Monday, shortly after take-off. Officials have said they are not expecting any survivors.

A transport safety official also said that the team looking for the crashed aircraft heard a ping sound late on Tuesday and divers were set to check the site Wednesday morning, Reuters reported.

The search and rescue team found a 22-meter long object underwater in the area where the plane was said to have crashed, a navy official reportedly told local media.

Transportation and safety officials have been searching for voice and data recorders and other clues to determine the cause of the crash of Lion Air’s brand-new Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet. It was the first accident of its kind for the variant of the top-selling plane.

Indonesia deployed divers to search for the plane and is also using “pinger locators” to zero in on the aircraft’s cockpit recorders.

Reuters said a witness on a boat at the crash site on Tuesday saw about 60 divers scattered in inflatable boats over slightly choppy waters entering the sea, which is about 35 meters (115 feet) deep. In all, 35 vessels are helping in the search, according to the news agency.

Debris, personal items and human remains have been recovered.

Indonesian transportation officials have said Boeing’s 737 MAX 8 planes will not be grounded, despite uncertainty surrounding Monday’s crash of Lion Air’s brand-new jet.

Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest and fastest-growing airlines, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations. The airline is a major customer of Boeing.

[“source=gsmarena”]